The Suitors

2012

"Like Downton Abbey but French, this confection of a novel is light as a macaron and just as sweet and nostalgic. "

ELLE

"Like a French Nancy Mitford, Cecile David-Weill (daughter of a former chairman of Lazard Freres) is at her most interesting when she’s parsing the manners of the super-rich, explaining why offering a Jet Ski as a hostess gift is simply never done."

Minneapolis Star Tribune

“The idea of this ‘behind closed doors’ among the ultra-rich is excellent and merciless in its charms…we can imagine seeing the film, and the realization is brilliant: it’s Vanity Fair meets Rules of the Game. You laugh a lot, you try to guess who is who, and you learn useful things.”

Christophe Ono-dit-Biot, Le Point

"The design of Suitors is delightful, with menus, schedules of arrivals of guests, seating arrangements, and other special pages that make is a lovely thing to hold in your hand."

Mary's Library

"It’s filled with the all the comforts (and the ridiculousness) of traditions and habits old and new. Sumptuous descriptions of the estate and their elaborate meals make for a charming read in more ways than one."

Linus's Blanket

"[A] delightful rendering of L’Agapanthe, an old French family’s summer estate on Cap d’Antibes dedicated to the art of gracious living...David-Weill draws readers in as graciously as any good hostess, but because of her personal background—she comes from an old-monied French family who vacation on Cap d’Antibes—readers may wonder if this is a roman à clef and will likely try to play a who’s who guessing game."

Publishers Weekly

“Cécile David-Weill gives readers an insider’s tour of the French upper classes frolicking in a grand villa on the Cote d’Azur where life is meals and proper etiquette is serious business. Beneath the hilarious portrayal of intellectuals, film stars, and the aristocratic elite is the poignant story of two sisters caught in the nostalgic longing for their childhood summers and a precious way of life. Like those sweet French macaroon cookies, this is a novel you will delight in until the very last page.”

Katharine Davis, author of Capturing Paris

"Laure is disarming and witty, and serves as a charming guide who takes us inside the world of the very rich—and the no longer so."

The Daily Beast

“A deliciously intimate look at the hijinks of the tres, tres rich on the Cote d’Azur. I laughed on every page, but don’t be fooled. The Suitors is above all a meditation on the inevitability of change.”

Patricia Volk, author of Stuffed and Shocked: My Mother, Schiaparelli, and Me.

"Deceptively charming and delightful, this novel by the French American David-Weill (Crush) portrays class issues and changing mores with the kind of intelligent taste that would make the Ettinguers proud."

Library Journal

"An entertaining and beautifully observed glimpse into the rarefied lives of the French one percent. Imagine Downton Abbey transported to a chic house in modern day south of France."

Ivana Lowell, author of Why Not Say What Happened?

“A charming peek behind the curtain of French high society as only the ultimate insider can. Cécile David-Weill’s novel is a delicious romp and I loved reading it!”

Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa cookbooks and TV

"The Suitors sets out to be a farce and a frolic, but throughout there is an undertone of nostalgia and wistfulness for a disappearing way of life."

Wall Street Journal

“Cécile David-Weill’s delightful novel of manners is a witty mix of wisdom and tongue-in-cheek humor touched with a decadent zest of Frenchiness. Irrésistible!”

Tatiana de Rosnay, author of The House I Loved, A Secret Kept, and Sarah’s Key

“Combining a sociologist’s eye for class nuances with wit as dry and sparkling as the best Champagne, Cécile David-Weill has drawn a meticulously observed, wickedly funny portrait of the 0.001%. Her protagonist Laure, a self-described ‘freemason of refinement,’ is determined to find a suitable savior for her family’s legendarily, but discreetly, luxurious house in the South of France; to that end, she tirelessly decodes the signs of old-school elegance and nouveau riche striving that abound (and clash, to hilarious effect) among the house’s revolving cast of art collectors and film stars, social climbers and grandes dames, sadistic nannies and billionaire yogis. The result is a sharply perceptive and addictively amusing insider’s look at today’s superrich—a direct heir to Edith Wharton’s and Marcel Proust’s portrayals of an earlier Gilded Age, and destined for a classic status all its own.”

Caroline Weber, the author of Queen of Fashion: What Marie-Antoinette Wore to the Revolution

“I loved Cécile David-Weill’s ‘Suitors,’ a charming comedy of manners set at a country estate in the South of France, apparently one of the few places in the world where anyone still has enough manners to make a comedy about.”

Andrew Solomon, New York Times Book Review

"If you've ever wondered what Downton Abbey would be like if it were set in the South of France during our current century, then pick up this smart novel de charme immediately...The intimate, fascinating detail with which Cécile David-Weill describes this society—complete with seating charts and chauffer pick-up schedules—is what elevates this book from a mere romp through old-money families of France into an intelligent, engaging study of a society that seems as if it should be extinct by now."

Oprah.com

Crush

1998

Amelie isn’t looking for love–but she’s hungry for pleasure. Written with cool-headed intensity and sexual heat, “Crush” is an unforgettable odyssey through the wilds of desire and into the badlands of erotic obsession.

Good Reads

"Sex in David's apartment, sex on a trip to Marrakech, sex in David's office, sex in David's country estate.... There is, yes, sex, sex, sex--though at times it gets rather alarmingly out of control."

Kirkus Reviews

"Lots of explicit sex and atmospherics--from the markets of Marrakech to salad lunches with girlfriends at Cafe Flore--enliven this sexy...series of bedroom escapades."

Publishers Weekly

"A play-by-play of a married woman's affair--from first kiss to last groan--leaving absolutely nothing to the imagination."

W

"A little book that astonishes, by the fierceness of its outlook, the rawness of its tone. Quirky...and immoral."

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